Governments of any hue tend to be guided in their policies, especially those on law and order and…

Governments of any hue tend to be guided in their
policies, especially those on law and order and crime prevention, by the desire
to be re-elected. Few political parties want to look weak on such issues,
especially when viewed against a background of extreme events such as riots
(witness the exemplary sentencing after the 2011 riots in England; Lightowlers
and Quirk, 2014), brutal murders and knife crime. Boyden (1997) argues that the
view of childhood in societies such as Britain is based on the priorities of
Western capitalism, which include ensuring the welfare and safety of children
but

Governments of any hue tend to be guided in their
policies, especially those on law and order and crime prevention, by the desire
to be re-elected. Few political parties want to look weak on such issues,
especially when viewed against a background of extreme events such as riots
(witness the exemplary sentencing after the 2011 riots in England; Lightowlers
and Quirk, 2014), brutal murders and knife crime. Boyden (1997) argues that the
view of childhood in societies such as Britain is based on the priorities of
Western capitalism, which include ensuring the welfare and safety of children
but not at the expense of the rich, and a desire to control undisciplined
children, a fear created by moral entrepreneurs through moral panics. In other
words, according to Boyden, policies relating to children are based on a
‘capitalist ideology’. A moral panic is the arousal of social concern about an
issue that has been identified by moral entrepreneurs, such as politicians,
campaigning journalists or members of religious and child welfare groups, who
often enlist the support of the mass media to highlight a concern that may be
out of proportion to the threat or danger posed. Such campaigns may focus on a
group, which often acts as a scapegoat, taking the blame for specific social
problems. These ‘moral panics’ often make scapegoats out of children for the
deficiencies of government policies in dealing with child poverty, youth
unemployment or inadequate education and training. It is highly revealing to
compare the responses of the government and the judicial system to two
significant events in recent years: the first event, or series of events, being
the financial crisis of 2008 and the second that of the summer riots of 2011 in
London and other cities in the UK. The former was precipitated by the criminal
activities of a number of bankers and financial experts who caused what Jesse
Eisinger (2014) of The New York Times describes as ‘the largest man-made
catastrophe since the Depression’ that resulted in the jailing of only one
banker in the US (Eisinger, 2014). Similarly, in Britain, very few bankers have
faced prosecution (The Economist, 2013). Regarding the summer riots of 2011, in
which thousands of young people as well as children took to the streets,
evidence suggests that the underlying causes of the violence were a general
feeling of injustice resulting from accusations of police racism, government
austerity measures, such as the ending of Educational Maintenance Allowance
(EMA) for those staying in education beyond 16, as well as the outrage
surrounding MPs’ expenses (The Guardian, 2011). However, politicians such as
the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, Prime Minister David Cameron, and Kenneth
Clarke, Secretary of State for Justice, dismissed such factors, referring to
the participants as ‘mindless’ (The Guardian, 2011). Indeed, there does seem to
have been a stark difference in approach to the two events by the justice
system and in particular the ‘zealous advocacy’ (Lightowlers and Quirk, 2014:
5) adopted by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in relation to the
prosecution of those involved in the riots, which was

glaringly absent in its treatment of the financiers
responsible for very serious criminal activity that adversely affected the
lives of many millions of people. Compared to the handful of bankers prosecuted
in Britain resulting from the financial crisis, over 1,500 people were
convicted of offences relating to the riots, with over 1,000 of these receiving
prison sentences. Over half of those prosecuted (53 per cent) were between the
ages of 10 and 20, and average sentences were 14.2 months, which is ‘almost
four times longer than sentences for similar offences in 2010’ (BBC, 2012).

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more